Knowledge Management in Organisations

Critically discuss the principle frameworks employed in the knowledge management literature to describe the social and human processes leading to innovation in organisations. What are the threats and opportunities posed for organisations from the existence of informal social networks, formal and informal communities of practice, and cross-community and boundary spanning activities?

Question 2 Introductory reading
Hislop (2018) Chapter 1: The Contemporary Importance of Knowledge Management
Chapter 4: What is Knowledge Management?
Chapter 12: Communities of Practice’
Chapter 13: Cross Community, Boundary Spanning Knowledge Processes
Conway Steve and Steward, Fred (2009) Managing and Shaping Innovation, OUP, Oxford.
Chapters 3 Innovation from a Network perspective
Chapter 9 Social Networks and Informality in the Innovation Process

Q2 suggested reading

Handley, K., Sturdy, A., Fincham, R., and Clark, T. (2006) Within and beyond communities of practice: making sense of learning through participation, identity and practice, Journal of Management Studies, 43(3): 641–53.

Hislop, D. (2003), ‘The complex relationship between communities of practice and the implementation of technological innovations’, International Journal of Innovation Management 7(2): 163-188.

Hayes, N and Walsham, G (2000), ‘Safe enclaves, political enclaves and knowledge working’ in Prichard, C., Hull, R., Chumer, M. and Wilmott, H. (eds.) (2000) Managing Knowledge: Critical Investigations of Work and Learning, Basingstoke: Palgrave, pp. 69-87.

Henry, N. and Pinch, S. (2001) Spatialising knowledge: placing the knowledge community of Motor Sport Valley’, Geoforum 31: 191-208

Hughes, J., Jewson, N. and Unwin, L. (2006), Communities of practice: critical perspectives, Routledge

Kinnie, J. and Swart, J. (2012), ‘Committed to whom? Professional knowledge worker commitment in cross-boundary organisations’, Human Resource Management Journal, 22(1): 21–38.

McKinlay, A. (2000), ‘Bearable lightness of control: organisational reflexivity and the politics of knowledge management’ in Prichard, C., Hull, R., Chumer, M. and Wilmott, H. (eds.) (2000) Managing Knowledge: Critical Investigations of Work and Learning, Basingstoke: Palgrave, pp. 107-121.

Quintas, P (2005), ‘Managing knowledge and innovation across boundaries’ in S. Little and T Ray (eds.), Managing Knowledge: An Essential Reader, London: Sage, pp. 255-271.

Roberts, J. (2006) Limits to communities of practice, Journal of Management Studies, 43(3): 623–63.

Starkey, K., Tempest, S. and McKinlay, A. (2004). How Organisations Learn. 2nd edn. London: Thomson.

Swann, J., Newall, S., Scarborough, H. and Hislop, D. (1999). ‘Knowledge management and innovations: networks and networking’, Journal of Knowledge Management, 3(4): 262-275

Wenger, E. (2000) Communities of practice and social learning systems, Organization, 7(2): 225–46.

Wenger, E. and Snyder, W. (2000) ‘Communities of practice: the organizational frontier’, Harvard Business Review, Jan–Feb: 139–45.

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