Research Studies Reviews: Clinical Supervision and Peer Coaching

Introduction

Peer coaching and clinical supervisions could be interpreted from various points of view and have several perceptions. Different articles have been used to describe the effectiveness of each indicating the different methods that the administrator might apply while performing his or her supervision. The clinical supervision involves a developmental evaluation that is meant to assist and enhance the instructions of teachers. According to Glickman, it is essential to perform a preconference, observation on lessons, information analysis and the interpretation of the teaching observed. Moreover, it’s essential to carry out a post-conference to determine the effectiveness of the process. Clinical supervision according to Bubenzer is an intervention that is provided to a junior member or a member of the profession from a senior member of a profession. The relationship between the staff is evaluative and perhaps extends over time, and further has simultaneous purposes of enhancing the efficient and professional operation of the members of staffs.  

On the other hand, Pallara’s article defines peer coaching as a confidential process from which two or more professional staff members work together to reflect on the existing practices, expand, refine, share ideas and each other’s problems, and conduct classroom research in the workplace. According to the article, it is vivid that peer coaching is not meant for any evaluation or any way to fix teachers problems process as in the case of clinical supervision. Different school systems have supported the process as a way to improve feedback about instructions and a curriculum system in an organization. One teacher reflected on the support of what peer coaching provides before any evaluation process in the organization addressing it as a dress rehearsal before the final process on the final performance. Thus, the research tends to give various ways through which peer coaching and clinical supervision are essential in a teaching organization.

Research Reviews on Clinical Supervision

Supervisors are versed with the potion of both science and art part of supervision. The science part of clinical supervision entails the formal theories and observations that have been proved. On the other hand, the art of supervision entails the knowledge and skills that professional accumulates with time either through the school or just during working environments. In summary, clinical supervision is an extensive educational process that enhances the therapeutic competency of the supervisee. Therefore, to emphasize on the client’s welfare, supervision is always provided with someone who has more experience than the supervisee and is perhaps skilled in the areas where the supervisee seeks for supervision. Bouverie took a training analysis based on clinical supervision to community health supervision. The result of the survey assisted the research department to understand and design a training package that was flexible to meet the requirements of the majority of the participants while addressing the core skills of supervision (Pajak, 2000).

As part of the methodology, questionnaires combined with the various expression of interest in the training were taken to different community health services in the region. The survey was designed to access the self-rated competency of a participant on a range of core supervisory skills. The result included; a summation of 54 community health staff was completing the survey process. The majority of the request came from staffs within the agencies that are currently offering supervision. Moreover, most of the supervisors (35) interested in the training said that they were yet to receive specific training. Consequently, the variation between individual respondents was more significant than any variation linked to whether the respondent had received some training on supervision. According to the research, the 54 community health completed their supervisory training. There was a significant improvement in training self-reported participants in the supervisory skills following the end of the training program.

Research Reviews on Peer Coaching

In peer coaching, the focus is on the teachers as a learner. According to Bennett (2009) describes the four aspects of teachers as learners. These are the technical, reflective, research and collaborative which played out in a variety of coaching experience. There are some research approaches to peer coaching technique. One type is to assist the teachers to transfer into classroom practice the new skills and ideas they have learned in workshops. This kind of approach involves numbers of training using specific methods. The participants in this plan are the teachers and the consultants during training sessions addressing the elements of the lesson concepts. The teacher pair with the consultants or one another to ensure there is a medium for the feedback involving the application of the new strategies to be applied in the classroom settings.

Therefore, the focus of the approach is compared to a training content or rather a workshop. The approach was performed in various teaching facilities approximately 60 in numbers to offer training services based on peer coaching. In each of the organizations, a maximum number of 10 teachers and ten consultants were made available for the process. Pairing between one teacher and one participant took place for two weeks. Therefore, to ensure its effectiveness, there a constant shift of members but the pairing was still on during the process.  Research has indicated that promotes the transfer of skills from one party to another. According to the study, it was found that after the entire process of the approach, there was a significant improvement in their skills of operation as a result of sharing techniques. There were a collaboration and unit experienced in the coaching technique applied. It was identified that effective communication and listening skills were essential in the process (Hooker, 2013).

Summative conclusion

Clinical supervision and peer coaching are the essential technique that is applied in many organizations to enhance productively. Clinical supervision involved creating an outlook system to monitor other staff members and verify their workability. On the other hand, peer coaching is essential as it enhances corporation and sharing of information within the organization’s departments. The sharing concept based on the approach improves the skills of performing work within a team and also promotes unity. Different clinical supervision, peer coaching does not exercise control. In summary, clinical supervision is an extensive educational process that enhances the therapeutic competency of the supervisee. Therefore, to emphasize on the client’s welfare, supervision is always provided with someone who has more experience than the supervisee and is perhaps skilled in the areas where the supervisee seeks for supervision.

According to the article, it is vivid that peer coaching is not meant for any evaluation or any way to fix teachers problems process as in the case of clinical supervision. Different school systems have supported the process as a way to improve feedback about instructions and a curriculum system in an organization. The clinical supervision involves a developmental evaluation that is meant to assist and enhance the instructions of teachers. The result of the survey assisted the research department to understand and design a training package that was flexible to meet the requirements of the majority of the participants while addressing the core skills of supervision.

References

Bennett, J. L. (2006). An agenda for coaching-related research: A challenge for researchers. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 58(4), 240.

Glickman, C. D. (2002). Leadership for learning: How to help teachers succeed. ASCD.

Glickman, C. D., Gordon, S. P., & Ross-Gordon, J. M. (2012). The basic guide to supervision and instructional leadership. Pearson Higher Ed.

Hooker, T. (2013). Peer coaching: A review of the literature. Waikato Journal of Education, 18(2).

Pajak, E. (2000). Approaches to clinical supervision: Alternatives for improving instruction. Christopher-Gordon Pub.

Pollara, J. (2012). Peer coaching: Teachers as leaders, teachers as learners. College of Saint Elizabeth.

Peer Coaching Implementation

Training Manual

Student’s Name

Fall 2017

Administration and Supervision of the Curriculum

Introduction

Peer to peer coaching is an essential technique for both personal and team leadership development. It can assist different organizational level to become more responsible for their leadership development, while at the same time developing coaching and communication skills that would make them are more efficient in their various departments. Therefore, as a supervisor, I believe that this program is essential and will boost the performance of the school as teachers will be able to corporate with each other and enhance their skills. All the participants and I will work together as a team; individual support leadership and management skills, to come up with new approaches to schools performance challenges and identify breakthrough solutions to the problems that exist in the classroom (Pollara, 2012).

The program will commence with a training course that outlines a six-step coaching process model that is designed to assist the teachers to help themselves and others towards the drive to superior success. Therefore, throughout the training sessions, the participants will reflect on what they are learning as coaches to proceed towards building the useful coaching behavior skills and can overcome the challenges experienced during the coaching process. Then, the participants should attend 5 one hour follow-ups on peer coaching sessions in which I will become the leader and a coaching instructor. Each of the peers coaching will include facilitation that lasts between 20-30 minutes short lessons to assist in clarify the goals, Reflection, listening, feedback and making up requests. The program is perhaps intended for the teachers and other staffs who are interested in learning peer coaching skills and techniques. The process is going to take six good months or more to ensure that it is useful.

The training manual

The process will take place through various module using both online and face to face strategies. The plan is as follows;

CategoryStrategyDurationLearning expectations
Module 1Online First monthThe theory of peer coaching, coaching cycle and attributes.
Module 2Face to faceSecond  MonthCoaching essential tools and requirements.
Module 3Start with face to face then finish with onlineMonth 3 and 4Peer coaching in practice majoring on discussions on 21st century learning process.
Module 4Online Month 4Effective planning for peer coaching techniques.
Module 5OnlineMonth 4, 5 and 6The particants are expected to learn about coaching practicum.

Assessing peer coaching

The participants should be given a copy of a digital copy of a peer coach training assessment information sheet. Moreover, the process of assessment will be open and supportive as all the participants will be briefed on how they are faring. In case one participant fails, he or she will be notified of the issue and then will be rectified to continue with the rest. The important assessment areas that each of the participants will be expected to understand are the 21st century learning design, coach training module and a practicum period in the schools. The participants must complete all the three components to become a peer coach.

The learning design component

The participants are expected to finish all the modules including an online training session and face to face participation.

Participation and competency

The component will involve both online and face to face for assessing the participants. Therefore, during the session the participants will be expected to show awareness of the following;

  • That he or she has read all the essential documents
  • Have developed their own journal
  • Have understood the coach roles and attributes
  • Coaching skills and groups norms.

Coach training module component

The program will involve the participant finishing a number of coaching cycles within a period of three months. These involve;

  • A signed coaching log
  • A short coaching report from one teacher in the school
  • A report record of lesson improvement process
  • A coaching narrative of what the participant have achieved during the process
  •  A peer coaching plan of implementation.

Reference

Pollara, J. (2012). Peer coaching: Teachers as leaders, teachers as learners. College of Saint Elizabeth.